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NBA Expansion?


Handlogten's Heros

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Why would they move 2 teams East?
Currently, there are 15 teams in each conference. If they add 2 West team, that would make it 17/15, so they'd need to move 1 team East.
Geographically, it would be MEM, but I think NO would be more likely, so they can get more Zion hype.
Because I have been practicing common core math with my kids and am only at step 12 of 17... I will have the answer soon enough.

I am not sure why I didn't catch this but I blame @infection
 


fishonjazz

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Because I have been practicing common core math with my kids and am only at step 12 of 17... I will have the answer soon enough.

I am not sure why I didn't catch this but I blame @infection
I have an irrational fear of common core math. Not looking forward to trying to help my daughter with that homework.
 

Gameface

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I have an irrational fear of common core math. Not looking forward to trying to help my daughter with that homework.
I don't think it's nearly as bad as a lot of people are making it out to be.

Growing up the way I did math was pretty damn similar to the examples of common core that I've seen online. I would "show my work" and because that wasn't the way I was taught to do math the teachers gave me a hard time or wouldn't accept my work at all. Breaking numbers into multiple easy to work with pieces and then putting them back together just makes sense to me and makes math easy(er) for me, especially being able to do it in my head.

I kind of hate that instead of letting everyone learn the way they learn best they are now pushing common core. I kind of hate it, but at the same time this is something that was developed by a bunch of education experts and all I hear are mostly non-college educated 40, 50 and 60 something year olds making fun of it without really knowing what it is.
 

LogGrad98

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I don't think it's nearly as bad as a lot of people are making it out to be.

Growing up the way I did math was pretty damn similar to the examples of common core that I've seen online. I would "show my work" and because that wasn't the way I was taught to do math the teachers gave me a hard time or wouldn't accept my work at all. Breaking numbers into multiple easy to work with pieces and then putting them back together just makes sense to me and makes math easy(er) for me, especially being able to do it in my head.

I kind of hate that instead of letting everyone learn the way they learn best they are now pushing common core. I kind of hate it, but at the same time this is something that was developed by a bunch of education experts and all I hear are mostly non-college educated 40, 50 and 60 something year olds making fun of it without really knowing what it is.
I make fun of it, and I have 2 degrees. But I am in my 50's. I had 2 kids that got hit at the beginning of it. The ridiculous thing was what you pointed out, it should be acceptable for people to learn how they learn best. My daughter was very very good at math. Did a lot in her head. She is in college to be a math teacher now (maybe English, she's changed a couple times). But she would do her assignment, much faster and more efficiently than common core taught, and get a bad grade with the right answer, wrong method. She got grades overturned which helped her keep her 3.95 GPA. But one class she had every answer right and was riding a B- because she wouldn't do the common core method. That was absolutely ridiculous. Watching her slog through algebra assignments was painful, especially when she was saying "the answer is -13" before she even started writing out the grid or whatever. And of course she was right.

It made math more difficult for my son too, even while he was not very good at math. He would still say "isn't it easier to add it across" rather than grouping and stuff. He got ok grades because he showed the work, but he also told me that getting into the real world math just does not work that way.

It's a joke. I think it might be a good tool for certain circumstances, or as an alternate method, but making it the end all be all was just stupid.
 

Gameface

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I make fun of it, and I have 2 degrees. But I am in my 50's. I had 2 kids that got hit at the beginning of it. The ridiculous thing was what you pointed out, it should be acceptable for people to learn how they learn best. My daughter was very very good at math. Did a lot in her head. She is in college to be a math teacher now (maybe English, she's changed a couple times). But she would do her assignment, much faster and more efficiently than common core taught, and get a bad grade with the right answer, wrong method. She got grades overturned which helped her keep her 3.95 GPA. But one class she had every answer right and was riding a B- because she wouldn't do the common core method. That was absolutely ridiculous. Watching her slog through algebra assignments was painful, especially when she was saying "the answer is -13" before she even started writing out the grid or whatever. And of course she was right.

It made math more difficult for my son too, even while he was not very good at math. He would still say "isn't it easier to add it across" rather than grouping and stuff. He got ok grades because he showed the work, but he also told me that getting into the real world math just does not work that way.

It's a joke. I think it might be a good tool for certain circumstances, or as an alternate method, but making it the end all be all was just stupid.
After I posted my response above I was wondering, if common core math is something that translates to programming easier or something?

Just seems odd that there was such a hard shift and that despite significant push-back it seems like a non-negotiable issue with no room for flexibility.

I never had to make a grid and my little hybrid method for doing math isn't common core as far as I know but I think a lot of the ridiculousness comes in when they are applying this method to problems that are easy enough to solve without it but since they are specifically trying to instill this system as THE way to do math you have to jump through stupid hoops when the solution is obvious without them.

Was there ever a time when problems became more complex that it seemed like it either made it easier to get to the solution or made it more likely to not make an err and therefore led to the correct answer more reliably or made complex problems easier to conceptualize?
 

LogGrad98

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After I posted my response above I was wondering, if common core math is something that translates to programming easier or something?

Just seems odd that there was such a hard shift and that despite significant push-back it seems like a non-negotiable issue with no room for flexibility.

I never had to make a grid and my little hybrid method for doing math isn't common core as far as I know but I think a lot of the ridiculousness comes in when they are applying this method to problems that are easy enough to solve without it but since they are specifically trying to instill this system as THE way to do math you have to jump through stupid hoops when the solution is obvious without them.

Was there ever a time when problems became more complex that it seemed like it either made it easier to get to the solution or made it more likely to not make an err and therefore led to the correct answer more reliably or made complex problems easier to conceptualize?
I mean I think there is a place for it. I think it could be used to help kids conceptualize relationships in numbers when first learning math. It can help them understand the logic of strange looking numbers like say 1327 + 258. But after setting a foundation I think they have to be able to teach other methods for different kinds of math, and have common core as a tool in the toolbox as needed.

Imo it was and attempt to Americanize the popular method of learning math in your head taught in several Asian countries back in the 80's and 90's. My cousin learned that and he essentially used his fingers to identify groupings and add large numbers pretty fast and efficiently. But as when we try to Americanize other things other countries do better than us, like the Toyota Production System becoming "Lean" and being way less effective, we lose the spirit of it and in lots of ways the effectiveness of it. Common core has all the hallmarks of **** like that.
 

Gameface

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I mean I think there is a place for it. I think it could be used to help kids conceptualize relationships in numbers when first learning math. It can help them understand the logic of strange looking numbers like say 1327 + 258. But after setting a foundation I think they have to be able to teach other methods for different kinds of math, and have common core as a tool in the toolbox as needed.

Imo it was and attempt to Americanize the popular method of learning math in your head taught in several Asian countries back in the 80's and 90's. My cousin learned that and he essentially used his fingers to identify groupings and add large numbers pretty fast and efficiently. But as when we try to Americanize other things other countries do better than us, like the Toyota Production System becoming "Lean" and being way less effective, we lose the spirit of it and in lots of ways the effectiveness of it. Common core has all the hallmarks of **** like that.
Every ****ing place I've been since I left the Navy is "lean" 5S this and 6S that with "black belts" and other ninja masters or whatever. I mean yeah, let's establish a place for all our **** and make sure it gets back there when we're done with it.
 

LogGrad98

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Every ****ing place I've been since I left the Navy is "lean" 5S this and 6S that with "black belts" and other ninja masters or whatever. I mean yeah, let's establish a place for all our **** and make sure it gets back there when we're done with it.
Yeah and my initial education in the Toyota Production System was working with actual Toyota engineers in redesigning a production line. By comparison, "Lean" is like adding panels to your Pacer so it vaguely resembles the Ferrari they are copying.
 

One Brow

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After I posted my response above I was wondering, if common core math is something that translates to programming easier or something?
Most likely, although I'm not familiar with common core specifically.

You don't need algebra skills to solve an algebra equation, when we have calculators that can do multi-dimensional calculus. What you do need an an understanding of how to properly set up the problem and what the strengths and limitations of the process are. Computers/calculators will give you an answer to any equation, but they won't tell you when the equation is wrong. When I'm grading, I award more points for method than I do for the correct answer.
 

Handlogten's Heros

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I have an irrational fear of common core math. Not looking forward to trying to help my daughter with that homework.
Don’t worry you won’t be able to help her… even when you come up with the right answers you won’t do it like the teacher did and thus are a failure.
 


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